To What Purpose are We Drawn to Tragedy: A Study of Shakespeare’s Hamlet

In this lecture, Cynthia Chung discusses whether there is a purpose to tragedy beyond merely being tragic and whether this was the intention of Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Along with a study of the play, two performances are compared and juxtaposed to determine what Shakespeare intended for his audience. Featured Cover Image: “Hamlet’s Vision” by Pedro Americo

Gaslighting: The Psychology of Shaping Another’s Reality

Cynthia Chung “But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked.“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.” – Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” We are…

Symposium: Rediscovering the Infinite Through Classical Art

The Rising Tide Foundation presents the Symposium: Rediscovering the Infinite Through Classical Art, which opened with a presentation by Cynthia Chung on Shakespeare and the use of tragedy in elevating an audience’s knowledge of human nature in order to break free from tragic dynamics within us. This was followed by a lecture delivered by Matthew…

RTF Review of “Seven Days in May”

John Frankenheimer’s “Seven Days in May” (1964) may be a Hollywood movie but it is also an incredibly insightful account of the problem with Cold War thinking, based off of the book by the same title. At the time it was meant to be a lesson and warning to those who allowed themselves to be…

The Art of Gaslighting

By Cynthia Chung For those who have not seen the 1944 psychological thriller “Gaslight” directed by George Cukor, I would highly recommend you do so since there is an invaluable lesson contained within, that is especially applicable to what I suspect many of us are experiencing nowadays. The story starts with a 14 year old…