A Song

By Gerald Therrien Is it to herald your regal realm,    proclaims this voice serene and bold? For all who hear it are in your care,    from God that right you do uphold! Is it a message sent far and wide,    an envoy to a love unseen? That seeks a mate of the…

Lessons from a Grecian Urn Part One: Truth and Beauty in Art

By David Gosselin An object is perfect, when everything manifold in it accords with the unity of its concept; it is beautiful, when its perfection appears as nature. The beauty increases, when the perfection becomes more complex and the nature suffers nothing thereby; for the task of freedom becomes more difficult with the increasing number…

Negative Capability: The Genius of Keats and Einstein

By David Gosselin “To develop a complete mind: Study the science of art; Study the art of science. Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” – Leonardo Da Vinci In reply to the deeply held popular belief that madness and creativity share a special kinship, this author argues, “They do not,…

Shall We Allow Poets in the Republic? Part Three

By Gerald Therrien At the end of part 2 of ‘Shall We Allow Poets in the Republic’, we came upon the proposition that poets either must be ‘possessed and insane’ and derive their inspiration from some divine influence – like the oracles and prophecies of the priests and priestesses of the gods, or that poets…

Vicarious Explorations into Genius: Hymn to Intellectual Beauty Analyzed

It has become commonplace to assert that artistic beauty is relative existing only in the eye of the beholder. This abused statement has become almost a parody in our modern age, as everything becomes art, and everything- regardless of its ugliness becomes raised to a pedestal of beauty. This loss of any principled standards of…

Beyond the Lines: Keats’ “Ode on Indolence”

By David Gosselin The question has been raised by many critics, academics, scientists, and artists, “What is Creativity?” In the spring of 1819, the poet John Keats experienced one of the greatest bursts of creativity in the history of art and science. When fully considered, the astounding poetic achievements of the spring of 1819 parallel…

Clarity vs. Obscurity IV: Yeats and the Occult

By Adam Sedia Click here for Part I, Part II and Part III to this series. Modernism produces obscure poetry because it denies the existence of absolute truth. Without a fundamental truth to reveal, poetry is relegated to presenting a series of images for the reader to supply the meaning of the text. Hart Crane…

The Power of Metaphor

By David Gosselin Metaphor should not be approached as some “thing,” but as a transformative power, the invisible process by which “things” come into being. Using metaphor, even very simple language and very common-place images can be brought into new, unique constellations. Contrary to the sundry definitions of metaphor proffered by many school teachers and…

Clarity vs. Obscurity V: Eliot’s Masks

By Adam Sedia Click here for Part I, Part II,  Part III , and Part IV to this series. T.S. Eliot means many things to many different people. Like Yeats he won the Nobel Prize in Literature. In the academy he numbers among the titans of twentieth-century poetry, with The Waste Land hailed as the epic of our…

Reviving the Memory of Time through Ruins

By Ryan Hamadeh An article I wrote that ponders the significance of Culture. What secrets inhabit this revered term. We use it abundantly in an ill defined way, but up close it reveals secrets which bestow meaning to our most profound perplexion. Countries to have lost their way in bitter war or societies that yearn…